Maui — Travel Log, Day 2

2 full days are in the books now and Maui is won­der­ful. We’re stay­ing in a condo Daniel got just south of Lahaina. Nice spot with a full kitchen, BBQ, laun­dry, and one row of houses back from the beach.

The first day was pretty low key. Just hung out at the beach next to the condo, picked up snorkel gear, and made an epic trip to Costco. Daniel and Leah had made a trip to the Safeway in Lahaina the first day and after going to Costco I’m pretty sure that Costco 1/4 to 1/5th of the price. We bought way, way too much food includ­ing 6 pounds of ground beef, 4 steaks, 6 pounds of brus­sel sprouts, 6 pounds of edamame, and enough onions to feed us for a week.

Yesterday, day 2, we drove around to the other side of the island and hiked the Waihee Ridge Trail. The east­ern side of Maui is much more what I was expect­ing the ter­rain to be like. Lush, wet, and filled with plants. The trail climbed about 1,500 feet over 2.5 miles and was a sim­ple up and back. Really nice hike and there weren’t too many other peo­ple out on it.

After the hike we were all drenched in sweat. Humidity will do that. So we went straight to Oluwalu Beach to swim and snorkel. The snorkel gear we picked up for the week at Snorkel Bob’s, which is a great deal. $35 for the entire time we’re here for a mask, snorkel, and fins. The beach­side sell­ers charge $100 and up for what looks like infe­rior equip­ment. The reef at Oluwalu was way bet­ter than Black Rock, which we swam in the first day. Here it stretched for a long, long way and we swam for about an hour. I’m ter­ri­ble at track­ing which fish we saw but we did swim with two sea tur­tles. One was swim­ming out to deeper water so we tailed behind for 10 min­utes or so. The other, and much larger, one was con­tent sit­ting under a ledge of coral. Would have loved to see him out and swim­ming as he was so much bigger.

Warren Ellis, How To See The Future:

The most basic mobile phone is in fact a com­mu­ni­ca­tions devices that shames all of sci­ence fic­tion, all the wrist radios and hand­held com­mu­ni­ca­tors. Captain Kirk had to tune his fuck­ing com­mu­ni­ca­tor and it couldn’t text or take a photo that he could stick a nice Polaroid fil­ter on. Science fic­tion didn’t see the mobile phone com­ing. It cer­tainly didn’t see the glow­ing glass win­dows many of us carry now, where we make amaz­ing things hap­pen by point­ing at it with our fin­gers like god­damn wizards.

via Daniel.

Confessions of an Ivy League Frat Boy: Inside Dartmouth’s Hazing Abuses. Particularly this quote:

The col­lege has also charged 27 other mem­bers of SAE, stem­ming from events in the 2011 pledge term. While the other stu­dents all cat­e­gor­i­cally deny doing any­thing ille­gal, the infor­ma­tion that Lohse pro­vided to Dartmouth offi­cials may directly impli­cate him in haz­ing. As a result, Lohse – the only stu­dent to come for­ward vol­un­tar­ily – may be the only stu­dent who is ulti­mately punished.

Also, see “Allegations of haz­ing lev­eled against TKE ini­ti­a­tion prac­tices” and Daniel’s post. I have an idea for an enter­pris­ing reporter: take a deep look at fra­ter­nity abuse reports like this and answer:

  • What per­cent­age are fol­lowed up on by news orga­ni­za­tions, par­tic­u­larly col­lege news­pa­pers, after the ini­tial report?
  • What per­cent­age result in con­crete action under­taken by col­lege administrations?
  • In how many cases is the stu­dent who reported the offense the one who takes the brunt of post-publication attacks?
  • How fre­quently are reports the sec­ond, third, etc. time alle­ga­tions have been made against a spe­cific fraternity?

There are more ques­tions that would be inter­est­ing but the above would be a start.